Incorporating Short Stories into ELT Classes: ‘The Red Hat’ by Morley Callaghan

The aim of this study is to suggest ways of incorporating literature into ELT classes to facilitate language development with a particular focus on skills practice in a communicative manner as well as critical thinking abilities, creativity and self-expression with Morley Callaghan’s short story, The Red Hat. The study provides activities devised for this text to show how literature use can also raise awareness on cultural and gender differences, historical and political events and promote personal growth while familiarizing students with features of a literary text and exposing them to an authentic contextualized teaching /learning material. Literature offers many tools to a language student to utilize and develop in many levels and it provides opportunities for fun, meaningful, interactional and collaborative work, therefore, creates a positive learning /teaching environment. Using short stories realizes this aim in an optimal way both for the students and teachers due to their length, linguistic and literary elements when compared to other genres. Dealing with these elements in a balanced way might ensure the appreciation of the literary text while developing linguistically. The capability to finish reading an authentic work in the target language, understand and interpret it might increase the sense of achievement. This can motivate the entire classes or the individual learners to read more literary works in the class and on their own. The Red Hat by Morley Callaghan is quite appropriate to achieve the anticipated benefits of incorporation of a short story in language classes.

Incorporating Short Stories into ELT Classes: ‘The Red Hat’ by Morley Callaghan

The aim of this study is to suggest ways of incorporating literature into ELT classes to facilitate language development with a particular focus on skills practice in a communicative manner as well as critical thinking abilities, creativity and self-expression with Morley Callaghan’s short story, The Red Hat. The study provides activities devised for this text to show how literature use can also raise awareness on cultural and gender differences, historical and political events and promote personal growth while familiarizing students with features of a literary text and exposing them to an authentic contextualized teaching /learning material. Literature offers many tools to a language student to utilize and develop in many levels and it provides opportunities for fun, meaningful, interactional and collaborative work, therefore, creates a positive learning /teaching environment. Using short stories realizes this aim in an optimal way both for the students and teachers due to their length, linguistic and literary elements when compared to other genres. Dealing with these elements in a balanced way might ensure the appreciation of the literary text while developing linguistically. The capability to finish reading an authentic work in the target language, understand and interpret it might increase the sense of achievement. This can motivate the entire classes or the individual learners to read more literary works in the class and on their own. The Red Hat by Morley Callaghan is quite appropriate to achieve the anticipated benefits of incorporation of a short story in language classes.

Kaynakça

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Kaynak Göster

APA Bayram, A , Töngür, A . (2020). Incorporating Short Stories into ELT Classes: ‘The Red Hat’ by Morley Callaghan . Manisa Celal Bayar Üniversitesi Eğitim Fakültesi Dergisi , 8 (2) , 30-38 .