Felix ACHOJA

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Fuel Wood Marketing System & The Need for Eco-tax Policy in Nigeria
What obligations do fuelwood suppliers and end-users have to the environment in the market-driven economy? Can fuelwood supply and demand behaviors be managed through tax governance to preserve the ecosystem? To provide answers to the questions, this study investigates the environmental conscious supply and demand for fuelwood in rural and urban areas and implications for ethical argument and tax governance in Nigeria. To achieve the stated objective, primary data collected with a questionnaire from randomly selected fuelwood suppliers and end-users were analyzed with mean, percentage, standard deviation, and t-statistics. The findings show that respondents were mainly young females (45years), literate (64%), married with relatively large family size (8 persons). They depend on farming (41%) and trading (41%) as major sources of livelihood. Fuelwood market participants and channel involve fuelwood gatherers, wholesalers, retailers, and end-users. The markets assume a competitive structure. The per capita fuelwood consumption in rural areas (19kg) is significantly (p<0.05) higher than the value (9.8kg) obtained in urban areas. Households’ per capita expenditure on fuelwood was ₦3,800 (US$108.57) and ₦1,960 (US$5.60) in rural and urban areas, respectively. Environmentally consciousness of fuelwood end-users should be fine-tuned by eco-tax and eco-subsidy governance in Nigeria.
Anahtar Kelimeler: fuel wood market, eco-tax gavernance, firewood demand &supply
Fuel Wood Marketing System & The Need for Eco-tax Policy in Nigeria
What obligations do fuelwood suppliers and end-users have to the environment in the market-driven economy? Can fuelwood supply and demand behaviors be managed through tax governance to preserve the ecosystem? To provide answers to the questions, this study investigates the environmental conscious supply and demand for fuelwood in rural and urban areas and implications for ethical argument and tax governance in Nigeria. To achieve the stated objective, primary data collected with a questionnaire from randomly selected fuelwood suppliers and end-users were analyzed with mean, percentage, standard deviation, and t-statistics. The findings show that respondents were mainly young females (45years), literate (64%), married with relatively large family size (8 persons). They depend on farming (41%) and trading (41%) as major sources of livelihood. Fuelwood market participants and channel involve fuelwood gatherers, wholesalers, retailers, and end-users. The markets assume a competitive structure. The per capita fuelwood consumption in rural areas (19kg) is significantly (p<0.05) higher than the value (9.8kg) obtained in urban areas. Households’ per capita expenditure on fuelwood was ₦3,800 (US$108.57) and ₦1,960 (US$5.60) in rural and urban areas, respectively. Environmentally consciousness of fuelwood end-users should be fine-tuned by eco-tax and eco-subsidy governance in Nigeria.
Keywords: firewood demand and supply, eco-tax governance, fuel wood market

Kaynakça

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