Improving Decision Making In Cancer Treatment With A Mix Of Cost-Effectiveness Analysis And Ethical Perspective: Usa Example

In the world, healthcare costs have been on the rise and getting largershare in the economic pie. Since we have limited resources, allocationof resources becomes more of an issue. Cancer is one of most leadingcauses of death in the world and each year, money spent on cancertreatment goes up. However, today new cancer drugs and treatmentonly provide narrow benefit with very high costs. Therefore, onlylimited number of people enjoys getting the treatment and fewertreatment or drugs are reimbursed. In addition, many countries do nothave a standard to decide whether a cancer drug or a treatment willbe covered. Considering both economic efficiency (cost-effectivenessanalysis) and ethical issues together during the decision process isof great importance so as to distribute health resources fairly andmaximize health benefits.

In the world, healthcare costs have been on the rise and getting larger share in the economic pie. Since we have limited resources, allocation of resources becomes more of an issue. Cancer is one of most leading causes of death in the world and each year, money spent on cancer treatment goes up. However, today new cancer drugs and treatment only provide narrow benefit with very high costs. Therefore, only limited number of people enjoys getting the treatment and fewer treatment or drugs are reimbursed. In addition, many countries do not have a standard to decide whether a cancer drug or a treatment will be covered. Considering both economic efficiency (cost-effectiveness analysis) and ethical issues together during the decision process is of great importance so as to distribute health resources fairly and maximize health benefits

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